this is a mess of stuff I like looking at

which will probably be reference or inspiration for stuff I decide to make someday but never do because the year is 2019 and we are all blogging about the inconvenience of a full-swing apocalypse while we hide out from zombies and various animal flus under moss-covered cardboard boxes (the new trend in eco-hoboism) (latent in all of us is an artist and a hero but each identity is mutually exclusive so I will spend my whole life crooning over my potential and listening to typical new sad songs without chasing any particular ambition) (it is so hard to focus on being mediocre while the distracting world is busily ending) (but my advice is to do it alone)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

UCLA Spinlab has another great video demonstrating the effects of rotation on a fluid. In a non-rotating fluid, flow over an obstacle is typically three-dimensional, with flow moving over as well as around the object. But in a steadily rotating fluid, as shown in the latter half of the video, the flow only moves around the obstacle, not over it. This non-intuitive behavior is part of the Taylor-Proudman theorem, which shows that flow around an obstacle in a rapidly rotating fluid will be two-dimensional and confined to planes perpendicular to the axis of rotation. (For the mathematically-inclined, Wikipedia does have a short derivation.) This 2D flow creates what are called Taylor columns over the obstacle. The Taylor column is like an imaginary extension of the original obstacle, turning the puck into a tall cylinder, and it’s real enough to flow, which diverts around it as though the column were there. (Video credit: UCLA Spinlab)

(via phyteclub)

— 1 day ago with 152 notes
libutron:

Large-leaf Grass of Parnassus - Parnassia grandifolia
Despite its common name, Parnassia grandifolia (Celastrales - Celastraceae) is not a grass, but a perennial herb, forming clusters of slightly succulent, shiny leaves. Its large, white flowers with green veins and bright orange anthers are really beautiful.
Parnassia grandifolia is native to central and south eastern US. It grows in alkaline seeps and is an indicator of rich, old forest. 
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Alan Cressler | Locality: Ocala National Forest, Marion Co., Florida, US (2010)

libutron:

Large-leaf Grass of Parnassus - Parnassia grandifolia

Despite its common name, Parnassia grandifolia (Celastrales - Celastraceae) is not a grass, but a perennial herb, forming clusters of slightly succulent, shiny leaves. Its large, white flowers with green veins and bright orange anthers are really beautiful.

Parnassia grandifolia is native to central and south eastern US. It grows in alkaline seeps and is an indicator of rich, old forest. 

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Alan Cressler | Locality: Ocala National Forest, Marion Co., Florida, US (2010)

(via phyteclub)

— 3 days ago with 5764 notes

Hayv Kahraman

The Saatchi Gallery

Hayv Kahraman is an Iraqi artist and painter. Her works reflect the controversial issues of gender, honor killings and war, all issues that plague her home country of Iraq. Hayv currently lives and works in San Francisco

Hayv Kahraman is an artist from Iraq. Spanning drawing, painting, and sculpture, her practice engages with very difficult issues surrounding female identity in her homeland – how women are victimised within their own culture, made subservient to men and often suffer the most from the effects of the war. Kahraman tells these tales of horror with a demure grace through her stunningly beautiful paintings. In this series of work, her images depict the scriptural story of the Sacrifice of The Lamb, which is central to the Islamic festival of Eid al-Adha, recasting the figures as women.

(Source: asylum-art, via phyteclub)

— 3 days ago with 1404 notes
"I think Bigfoot is blurry, that’s the problem. It’s not the photographers’ fault. Bigfoot is blurry and that’s extra scary to me. There’s a large, out-of-focus monster roaming the countryside."
— 4 days ago with 29445 notes
"Ancient moon priestesses were called virgins. ‘Virgin’ meant not married, not belonging to a man - a woman who was ‘one-in-herself’. The very word derives from a Latin root meaning strength, force, skill; and was later applied to men: virle. Ishtar, Diana, Astarte, Isis were all all called virgin, which did not refer to sexual chastity, but sexual independence. And all great culture heroes of the past, mythic or historic, were said to be born of virgin mothers: Marduk, Gilgamesh, Buddha, Osiris, Dionysus, Genghis Khan, Jesus - they were all affirmed as sons of the Great Mother, of the Original One, their worldly power deriving from her. When the Hebrews used the word, and in the original Aramaic, it meant ‘maiden’ or ‘young woman’, with no connotations to sexual chastity. But later Christian translators could not conceive of the ‘Virgin Mary’ as a woman of independent sexuality, needless to say; they distorted the meaning into sexually pure, chaste, never touched."

Monica Sjoo, The Great Cosmic Mother: Rediscovering the Religion of the Earth  (via thewaking)

Literally the most important thing you will read today.

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#staywoke

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(Source: ynannarising, via porcelain-mirror)

— 4 days ago with 109406 notes