this is a mess of stuff I like looking at

which will probably be reference or inspiration for stuff I decide to make someday but never do because the year is 2019 and we are all blogging about the inconvenience of a full-swing apocalypse while we hide out from zombies and various animal flus under moss-covered cardboard boxes (the new trend in eco-hoboism) (latent in all of us is an artist and a hero but each identity is mutually exclusive so I will spend my whole life crooning over my potential and listening to typical new sad songs without chasing any particular ambition) (it is so hard to focus on being mediocre while the distracting world is busily ending) (but my advice is to do it alone)

http://phyteclub.tumblr.com/post/98763403528/isozyme-remember-you-are-mechanical-not-only-in →

isozyme:

remember you are mechanical, not only in the ball and socket of your shoulders, or the resilient padding of your knees, but are in fact built from hinges, gears, and switches all the way into to your smallest bits

when your nerves fire, a tiny rod gets turned and a hole opens,…

— 1 day ago with 1934 notes
ianference:

This photograph of the second-story landing of the floating staircase in the now-demolished Clocktower building at Worcester State Hospital was over 6 years in the making.  I first attempted to capture it in 2006; I got my film back and was unimpressed with the results.  I tried other times over the years.  I’d get my film back, and be unimpressed.  Finally, in 2012, right before they demolished the asylum, I made a final trip and made a 10-minute exposure right during sunrise - and it came out perfectly.
Print available by clicking here.

ianference:

This photograph of the second-story landing of the floating staircase in the now-demolished Clocktower building at Worcester State Hospital was over 6 years in the making.  I first attempted to capture it in 2006; I got my film back and was unimpressed with the results.  I tried other times over the years.  I’d get my film back, and be unimpressed.  Finally, in 2012, right before they demolished the asylum, I made a final trip and made a 10-minute exposure right during sunrise - and it came out perfectly.

Print available by clicking here.

(via phyteclub)

— 1 day ago with 2029 notes
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:


In the dark of the ocean, some animals have evolved to use bioluminescence as a defense. In the animation above, an ostracod, one of the tiny crustaceans seen flitting near the top of the tank, has just been swallowed by a cardinal fish. When threatened, the ostracod ejects two chemicals, luciferin and luciferase, which, when combined, emit light. Because the glow would draw undesirable attention to the cardinal fish, it spits out the ostracod and the glowing liquid and flees. Check out the full video clip over at BBC News. Other crustaceans, including several species of shrimp, also spit out bioluminescent fluids defensively. (Image credit: BBC, source video; via @amyleerobinson)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In the dark of the ocean, some animals have evolved to use bioluminescence as a defense. In the animation above, an ostracod, one of the tiny crustaceans seen flitting near the top of the tank, has just been swallowed by a cardinal fish. When threatened, the ostracod ejects two chemicals, luciferin and luciferase, which, when combined, emit light. Because the glow would draw undesirable attention to the cardinal fish, it spits out the ostracod and the glowing liquid and flees. Check out the full video clip over at BBC News. Other crustaceans, including several species of shrimp, also spit out bioluminescent fluids defensively. (Image credit: BBC, source video; via @amyleerobinson)

(via christinefriar)

— 1 day ago with 12327 notes

silenceofthevoid:

thisismyplacetobe:

A ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse is a rare phenomenon that occurs when the moon’s orbit is at its apogee: the part of its orbit farthest away from the Earth. Because the moon is so far away, it seems smaller than normal to the human eye. The result is that the moon doesn’t entirely block out our view of the sun, but leaves an “annulus,” or ring of sunlight glowing around it. Hence the term  “annular” eclipse rather than a “total” eclipse.

I’m in complete awe.

(via surewecouldsee)

— 2 days ago with 205419 notes

geoffrox:

Imagine if the series had ended right after this moment.

(Source: gusfrngs, via porcelain-mirror)

— 2 days ago with 275026 notes
thedoppelganger:


People overlooking the beautiful salt Lake Urmia in Iran before it dries up due to the dam built nearby by the government.

The White Meadows, Mohammad Rasoulof, 2009

thedoppelganger:

People overlooking the beautiful salt Lake Urmia in Iran before it dries up due to the dam built nearby by the government.

The White Meadows, Mohammad Rasoulof, 2009

(Source: theparalleluniverse, via afjordable)

— 2 days ago with 19497 notes
getintunee:

lost—in—absentia:

lost—in—absentia:

Chickasaw Nation: The Fight to Save a Dying Native American Language
A 50,000 year-old indigenous Native American tribe that has weathered the conquistadors, numerous wars with the Europeans, the American Revolution and the Civil War is now fighting to preserve its language and culture by embracing modern technology.
There are 6,000 languages spoken in the world but linguists fear that 50% of them will become extinct within the next century. In the US, 175 Native American languages are spoken, but fewer than 20 are expected to survive the next 100 years.
The language of the Chickasaws, known as “Chikashshanompa”, is a 3,000-year-old living language that is categorised by Unesco as being “severely endangered”.
The last remaining monolingual speaker of this language, Emily Johnson Dickerson, 93, died in December. Now the tribe is scrambling to make sure that its language does not become lost.
Dwindling native speakers
The Chickasaw Nation consists of 57,000 people, including 38,000 who live in 13 counties in Oklahoma, a state designated as the Indian Territory which boasts rich oil and natural gas preserves.
"There were over 3,000 speakers of Chickasaw in the 1960s," Joshua Hinson, director of the Chickasaw Nation Language Department tells IBTimes UK.
"The last native speakers who learnt the language at home were born in the late 1940s. From that point on, with people leaving Oklahoma for other parts of the US, mandatory schooling and political pressures to be bilingual in English, the number of people dropped, and now, our youngest native speakers are in their 60s."
There are now only 65 native speakers of the Chickasaw language who are also fully bilingual in English, and only four to five confident conversational speakers who are under the age of 35.
Modern Chickasaw people in Oklahoma live in houses on land held in trust for the Chickasaw Nation by the Federal government.
They have been Christian since the Civil War, although religion co-exists with traditional native Chickasaw customs.
Some customs have died out, such as the native doctors and practice of native medicine, but others, like the role of the woman as a matriarch in the family and in government, have continued, and 60% of the community’s leaders are women.Read more at:http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/chickasaw-nation-fight-save-dying-native-american-language-1447670

Whoever reblogged this and got it to 280 notes…THANK YOU.Preservation of language is a cultural necessity! 

getintunee:

lost—in—absentia:

lost—in—absentia:

Chickasaw Nation: The Fight to Save a Dying Native American Language

A 50,000 year-old indigenous Native American tribe that has weathered the conquistadors, numerous wars with the Europeans, the American Revolution and the Civil War is now fighting to preserve its language and culture by embracing modern technology.

There are 6,000 languages spoken in the world but linguists fear that 50% of them will become extinct within the next century. In the US, 175 Native American languages are spoken, but fewer than 20 are expected to survive the next 100 years.

The language of the Chickasaws, known as “Chikashshanompa”, is a 3,000-year-old living language that is categorised by Unesco as being “severely endangered”.

The last remaining monolingual speaker of this language, Emily Johnson Dickerson, 93, died in December. Now the tribe is scrambling to make sure that its language does not become lost.

Dwindling native speakers

The Chickasaw Nation consists of 57,000 people, including 38,000 who live in 13 counties in Oklahoma, a state designated as the Indian Territory which boasts rich oil and natural gas preserves.

"There were over 3,000 speakers of Chickasaw in the 1960s," Joshua Hinson, director of the Chickasaw Nation Language Department tells IBTimes UK.

"The last native speakers who learnt the language at home were born in the late 1940s. From that point on, with people leaving Oklahoma for other parts of the US, mandatory schooling and political pressures to be bilingual in English, the number of people dropped, and now, our youngest native speakers are in their 60s."

There are now only 65 native speakers of the Chickasaw language who are also fully bilingual in English, and only four to five confident conversational speakers who are under the age of 35.

Modern Chickasaw people in Oklahoma live in houses on land held in trust for the Chickasaw Nation by the Federal government.

They have been Christian since the Civil War, although religion co-exists with traditional native Chickasaw customs.

Some customs have died out, such as the native doctors and practice of native medicine, but others, like the role of the woman as a matriarch in the family and in government, have continued, and 60% of the community’s leaders are women.

Read more at:
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/chickasaw-nation-fight-save-dying-native-american-language-1447670

Whoever reblogged this and got it to 280 notes…THANK YOU.
Preservation of language is a cultural necessity! 

(Source: fani-hilha, via porcelain-mirror)

— 3 days ago with 4212 notes